Connect with us
Saturday Night Fever review
Image: Paramount Pictures

Film

Saturday Night Fever is a Lot Darker Than You Remember 

Saturday Night Fever at 45!

How does the popular imagination remember 1977’s Saturday Night Fever, which arrived 45 years ago this week? Much of that cultural headspace entails John Travolta, strutting down a street in Brooklyn, as the Bee Gees’ “Staying Alive” plays. Much of the rest of it has Travolta dancing like a God to disco music on the sort of light-up dance floor that only existed in the late ’70s. 

All of that is real, and all of it is spectacular. The film offers one of the best soundtracks in the history of movies, featuring the Bee Gees and many other major disco music acts, and Travolta is magnetic in the role, absolutely believable as a man whose dancing is able to turn every head in the room. 

 But at the same time, Saturday Night Fever is dark as hell, full of sad and horrific things, all dealt with with a tone of moral ambiguity. Directed by John Badham, who replaced John G. Avildsen shortly before production began, it’s very much a movie of the ’70s, in other words. 

And make no mistake: things get very, very dark. There are multiple rape scenes, including an attempted one perpetrated by the movie’s hero, as well as a suicide, lots of violence, a plethora of racial slurs, and many, many scenes of Brooklyn Italians yelling at each other. 

Saturday Night Fever
Image: Paramount Pictures

There’s also the part about how disco was a genre and lifestyle created by gay and Black people, yet the hit movie about it that followed a couple of years later was almost entirely about straight white people, and that the film was adapted from a magazine article that turned out to be almost entirely fabricated, by a British writer who came to New York to write about the disco scene but barely left his hotel. 

Travolta, in his breakthrough movie performance at age 23, plays 19-year-old Tony Manero, an Italian-American native of Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, who lives for his nights on the dance floor at the 2001 Odyssey, usually followed by getting drunk and climbing up the pulleys of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge. But the rest of the time, his life sucks. 

He lives with his squawking mother and father, as well as a brother who recently quit the priesthood, and he works a dead-end job at a paint shop. He hangs out most of the time with a group of guys who he doesn’t respect much, and he can’t seem to straighten out his romantic life either. 

Tony also seems to be lacking in ambition. He’s obviously talented enough to become some type of professional dancer but doesn’t seem to have the drive or the knowledge to get there. 

Saturday Night Fever
Image: Paramount Pictures

Less defensible is that the film treats the subject of rape with a lack of gravity that would be absolutely horrific by today’s standards. Tony, the film’s hero, attempts to rape his dance contest partner Stephanie, and she fights him off; later that night, Tony is present in the car when another woman, his former dance partner, is raped by one of his friends, and he does nothing to stop it. 

Then, in the film’s final scene — the next morning! — Tony goes to Stephanie’s house, apologies, she forgives him, and that’s that. 

Saturday Night Fever‘s story is told quite well, in a way that — bogus source material notwithstanding — is likely an accurate description of the language and behavior of blue-collar Italian-American men in 1970s Bay Ridge. The all-time favorite film of the late critic Gene Siskel, it’s a movie deserving of its place in the cultural canon. 

Written By

Stephen Silver is a journalist and film critic based in the Philadelphia area. He is the co-founder of the Philadelphia Film Critics Circle and a Rotten Tomatoes-listed critic since 2008, and his work has appeared in New York Press, Philly Voice, The Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Tablet, The Times of Israel, and RogerEbert.com. In 2009, he became the first American journalist to interview both a sitting FCC chairman and a sitting host of "Jeopardy" on the same day.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Rosie Lowe

    December 17, 2022 at 10:44 am

    This is one of the trashiest movies ever made. Travolta’s character is disgusting. His buddies are disgusting. They curse, rape and they are supposed to be so cool. A bunch of jerks. And Stephanie! A total idiot.

  2. Andrew Kidd

    December 19, 2022 at 12:04 am

    Kyle Smith also wrote an excellent piece in National Review a few years back expanding on these very facts. It’s a very good film but also a very sad and tragic film, one that makes a better companion to Mean Streets than to Grease or American Graffiti. Also, like Mean Streets, it seems to inspired in part by Federico Fellini’s I Vitelloni.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Facebook

Trending

Greatest Royal Rumble Matches of All time Greatest Royal Rumble Matches of All time

Greatest Royal Rumble Matches

Wrestling

Don West Don West

Remembering Wrestling Sports Broadcaster Don West

Culture

The Last of Us Infected The Last of Us Infected

The Last of Us Looks for Love in a Hopeless Place with “Infected”

TV

Hear Me Out Hear Me Out

Hear Me Out Never Finds Its Own Voice

Film

Kaleidoscope Kaleidoscope

Kaleidoscope (2023): How the Newest Hypnotic Netflix Toy Stumbles with its Unique Format

TV

Greatest Royal Rumble Matches of All time Greatest Royal Rumble Matches of All time

Top 5 WWE Wrestlers To Win The 2023 Royal Rumble

Wrestling

Bill Nighy is a Living Marvel in This Kurosawa Remake

Culture

The Last of Us When You're Lost in the Darkness The Last of Us When You're Lost in the Darkness

The Last of Us Begins with the Bleak, Familiar “When You’re Lost in the Darkness”

TV

Sundance 2023: The Eight Must-See Films at the Festival

Culture

WWE Royal Rumble 1992 WWE Royal Rumble 1992

Why the 1992 WWE Royal Rumble Match is Still The Best

Culture

maxwell jacob friedman maxwell jacob friedman

MJF and Three Potential First-Time Feuds for 2023 

Culture

When It Melts movie review When It Melts movie review

When It Melts Continues an Important Conversation with Unflinching Pathos

Culture

Magazine Dreams Review Magazine Dreams Review

Magazine Dreams is a Volcanic Study of A Self-consuming Bodybuilder

Culture

Ranking The Chicago Bulls Dynasty Opponents In The ’90s

Culture

WWE sale - Vince McMahon WWE sale - Vince McMahon

The Available Options For A Potential Sale Of WWE

Culture

Monday Night RAW At 30: Ten Best RAW Matches To Watch from 1993

Culture

Connect