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In the Mouth of Madness review

Sordid Cinema Podcast

Sordid Cinema Podcast #537: Does John Carpenter’s In the Mouth of Madness Stand the Test of Time?

In The Mouth of Madness Podcast Review

With a list of classics under his belt that includes masterpieces like Halloween, Assault on Precinct 13, and The Thing, John Carpenter has long been celebrated by movie lovers, even if many of his films have flown under the radar with general audiences. This week the Sordid Cinema Podcast looks back at one of his most underrated (at least according to us) works, 1994’s In the Mouth of Madness. Rick and Patrick are joined by fellow Carpenter fan and Goomba Stomp writer Christopher Cross to break down just what makes all the psychological horror here so memorable.

So what exactly is going on in this story of a cocky insurance claims investigator tracking down a mysterious horror writer in a creepy town? How much inspiration does the film take from sources like H.P. Lovecraft, the noir genre, Stephen King, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers? Does the lunacy on display hold up today? And what’s with that cast of extras? For all this and much more discussion, have a listen! For all this and more, have a listen!

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Written By

Some people take my heart, others take my shoes, and some take me home. I write, I blog, I podcast, I edit, and I design websites. Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Goomba Stomp and Tilt Magazine. Host of the Sordid Cinema Podcast and NXpress Nintendo Podcast. Former Editor-In-Chief of Sound On Sight, and host of several podcasts including the Game of Thrones and Walking Dead podcasts, as well as Sound On Sight. There is nothing I like more than basketball, travelling, and animals. You can find me online writing about anime, TV, movies, games and so much more.

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